BrownhillsBob's #365daysofbiking

July 11th - If you fancy a free, breathtaking aerial entertainment display, get your backside down to the Tame Valley Canal, and just look up.

High tension lines run along the canal from a control compound at Ocker Hill to another at Ray Hall, and this interlink is currently undergoing service. Huge scaffold towers and nets span roads, canals and railways, to support lowered lines; engineers scramble and dangle high above from the steel lattice-work, oblivious to the toe-curling peril they appear to be in.

They work quickly and with precision amongst a baffling array of hawsers, catenaries, safety lines and fall arresters, materials and tools being hoisted ip in a sack via a block and tackle hoist. 

And below? I watch, open mouthed at these confident, sure-footed and highly skilled engineers. Whatever they’re paid, it can’t possibly be enough.

November 18th - Today I made time to take a quick photograph of the concrete play sculpture at Chasewater, featured in a post on my main blog. It was created in 1962 by artist Bryan Blumer as a climbing object for kids, and originally stood in the play park. As Anne Bradbury says, it now somewhat ironically stands on a traffic island with notices requesting kids don’t play on it. Sad.

August 21st - Rugeley Road fades into Hayfield Hill in the big dip between Chase Terrace and Cannock Wood, near Castle Ring. This is a great hill to climb, and a very fast downhill run. During this most gorgeous golden hour, Gentleshaw Common glowed in the evening cool. This is a lovely view, of which I never tire.

August 21st - Rugeley Road fades into Hayfield Hill in the big dip between Chase Terrace and Cannock Wood, near Castle Ring. This is a great hill to climb, and a very fast downhill run. During this most gorgeous golden hour, Gentleshaw Common glowed in the evening cool. This is a lovely view, of which I never tire.